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Impact of language on thought and worldview, especially in the domains of time and space
Keun Jun Song
Art der Arbeit
Masterarbeit
Universität
Universität Wien
Fakultät
Philologisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
Studiumsbezeichnung bzw. Universitätlehrgang (ULG)
Masterstudium English Language and Linguistics
Betreuer*in
Nikolaus Ritt
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DOI
10.25365/thesis.41118
URN
urn:nbn:at:at-ubw:1-30402.53097.124264-8
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Abstracts

Abstract
(Deutsch)
With my research question ´Has recent experimental research found evidence for the hypothesis that one’s native language, especially in the categories of its conception and description of time and space, constrains one’s capacities of experiencing and conceptualizing physical, if not social, reality in a strong sense?´, this research is going to explore if speakers of a certain language can have a line of thought that those of other languages cannot. This paper is going to review several major sub-hypotheses of linguistic relativity and compare some of the most noteworthy findings of relatively recent research on linguistic relativity with each other by focusing on what kinds of new insight they may possibly provide, on how they may complement or contradict one another and on what limitations they may involve. Also, this research is going to deal with the issue of discontinuous classification, along with several other issues, from the perspective of linguistic relativity. Given that quite a few pieces of meticulous research on the topic in question have been done and are being done, copious pieces of evidence regarding linguistic relativity may be gushed out in the foreseeable future. What lies in the future research may be to illuminate the mechanism of linguistic relativity with the aid of other disciplines to estimate the extent of the impact of language on thought and worldview so that they can see how substantial it is.
Abstract
(Englisch)
With my research question ´Has recent experimental research found evidence for the hypothesis that one’s native language, especially in the categories of its conception and description of time and space, constrains one’s capacities of experiencing and conceptualizing physical, if not social, reality in a strong sense?´, this research is going to explore if speakers of a certain language can have a line of thought that those of other languages cannot. This paper is going to review several major sub-hypotheses of linguistic relativity and compare some of the most noteworthy findings of relatively recent research on linguistic relativity with each other by focusing on what kinds of new insight they may possibly provide, on how they may complement or contradict one another and on what limitations they may involve. Also, this research is going to deal with the issue of discontinuous classification, along with several other issues, from the perspective of linguistic relativity. Given that quite a few pieces of meticulous research on the topic in question have been done and are being done, copious pieces of evidence regarding linguistic relativity may be gushed out in the foreseeable future. What lies in the future research may be to illuminate the mechanism of linguistic relativity with the aid of other disciplines to estimate the extent of the impact of language on thought and worldview so that they can see how substantial it is.

Schlagwörter

Schlagwörter
(Englisch)
Language Thought Worldview
Schlagwörter
(Deutsch)
Sprache Denken Weltanschauung
Autor*innen
Keun Jun Song
Haupttitel (Englisch)
Impact of language on thought and worldview, especially in the domains of time and space
Publikationsjahr
2016
Umfangsangabe
iv, 98 Seiten
Sprache
Englisch
Beurteiler*in
Nikolaus Ritt
Klassifikation
17 Sprach- und Literaturwissenschaft > 17.69 Sprachwissenschaft: Sonstiges
AC Nummer
AC13236259
Utheses ID
36396
Studienkennzahl
UA | 066 | 812 | |
Universität Wien, Universitätsbibliothek, 1010 Wien, Universitätsring 1